Confucianism and superior man

Confucius applied very meaningful definitions to the term, and clearly and succinctly explained its meaning.

Confucianism and superior man

A Reflection on Confucianism

Ordinary men and women, however ignorant, may meddle with the knowledge of it; yet, in its utmost reaches, there is that which even the sage does not discern. Ordinary men and women, however below the average standard of ability, can carry it into practice; yet, in its utmost reaches, p.

For the completion of its work, it requires, also, the whole of life, every deflection from virtue marring by so much the perfection of the whole. Its saintliness lies not in purity alone, but in the rounded fulness of the well-planned and well-spent life, the more a thing of beauty if extended to extreme old age.

Confucius thus modestly hints how slowly it develops at best, when he says: At thirty I stood firm. At forty I was free from doubt. At fifty I knew the decrees of Heaven. At sixty my ear was an obedient organ for the reception of truth.

At seventy I could follow what my heart desired without transgressing what was right. That it is not finished until death rings down the curtain upon the last act, is shown in the "Analects" by this aphorism attributed to his disciple, Tsang: His burden is heavy and his course is long.

Perfect virtue is the burden which he considers it his to p. Only with death does his course stop; is it not long? The same thing is put forward in a different way in the "Li Ki," thus: The Chinese sage had no delusions about the real nature of the art of living, the rules of human conduct; he knew and understood that ethics are of the mind, that sticks and stones are neither moral nor immoral but merely unmoral, and that the possibilities of good and evil choices come only when the intelligence dawns which alone can choose between them.

Mencius considerably extended this view, starting from the position: Not that he did not recognize the perils of unrestrained p.

The Superior Man and the Inferior Man | Falun Dafa - attheheels.com

Most people throw it away, the superior man preserves it. And again he refers to this inexcusable reversal of the natural order, thus: The "Li Ki" says of this, more explicitly: His activity shows itself as he is acted on by external things, and develops the desires incident to his nature.

Things come to him more and more, and his knowledge is increased. Then arise the manifestations of liking and disliking. When these are not regulated by anything within, and growing knowledge leads more astray without, he cannot come back to himself, and his Heavenly principle is extinguished.

On this we have the rebellious and deceitful heart, with licentious and violent disorder. Therefore, with acumen and discernment never excelled, Confucius divined that the mind must first be honest with itself. This indicates the essential immorality of the mind which clings to that which it does not know, with fervency and loyalty more devoted than that with which it holds to that which it does know.

The Qualities of A Superior Man by Confucius

That one should not be swayed by what he prefers to believe, is again asserted in these words of the "Shu-King," ascribed to I Yin pt. Have no depraved thoughts.(attheheels.com) "The Superior Man" is a term that was used a long time ago.

Confucius applied very meaningful definitions to the term, and clearly and succinctly explained its meaning. According to Confucius' model, the superior man is one with ideal characteristics who epitomizes excellence.

Confucianism and superior man

In both Confucianism and Taoism there is a concept of the Superior Man. Name and define some of the principles which are embodied in the Superior man, according to each religion and compare them. (Additional information on Taoism is found in Week 5). In both Confucianism and Taoism there is a concept of the Superior Man.

Name and define some of the principles which are embodied in the Superior man, according to each religion and compare them. I had the task of this question and doing the research on the two to see if there was a difference.

The superior man does not promote a man on account of his words, nor does he put aside good words on account of the man. (Analects, bk. xv., c. xxii.) To be able to judge others by what is in ourselves, this may be called the art of virtue.

The junzi is a Chinese philosophical term often translated as "gentleman" or "superior person" and employed by both the Duke of Wen in the I-ching and Confucius in Literal meaning: "lord's son". The superior man [Junzi] cannot care about the everything, just as he cannot go to check all himself!

If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth .

Junzi - Wikipedia