A review of the 1972 film cabaret

Pre-production[ edit ] Playwrights Jay Presson Allen and Hugh Wheeler went back to the original stories to restore the subplot about the gigolo and the Jewish heiress. They also drew on original author Christopher Isherwood's openness about his homosexuality to make the leading male character, a writer modeled on him, a bisexual who shares his bed and a male lover with Sally.

A review of the 1972 film cabaret

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Production Pre-production Playwrights Jay Presson Allen and Hugh Wheeler went back to the original stories to restore the subplot about the gigolo and the Jewish heiress.

They also drew on original author Christopher Isherwood's openness about his homosexuality to make the leading male character, a writer modeled on him, a bisexual who shares his bed and a male lover with Sally.

Fosse decided to increase the focus on the Kit Kat Klub, where Sally performs, as a metaphor for the decadence of Germany in the s by eliminating all but one of the musical numbers performed outside the club. The only remaining outside number is "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", a folk song rendered spontaneously by patrons at an open-air cafe in one of the film's most chilling scenes.

A review of the 1972 film cabaret

Minnelli had auditioned to play Sally in the original Broadway production. Some involved with the show say she was too inexperienced at the time, though she had already won Broadway's Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical. Others have suggested that she was too big a presence for the role as written on Broadway.

By the time Cabaret reached the screen, however, Minnelli was a major film star, having won an Oscar nomination as the emotionally damaged college student in 's The Sterile Cuckoo.

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This was the first film produced in the revival of Allied Artists. Determined to direct the film, Fosse urged Feuer to hire him. Mankiewicz or Gene Kelly. Feuer appealed to the studio heads, citing Fosse's talent for staging and shooting musical numbers, adding that if inordinate attention was given to filming the book scenes at the expense of the musical numbers, the whole film could fail.

Fosse was ultimately hired. Over the next months, Fosse met with previously hired writer Jay Allen to discuss the screenplay. Dissatisfied with Allen's script, he hired Hugh Wheeler to rewrite and revise her work.

A review of the 1972 film cabaret

Wheeler is referred to as a "research consultant", while Allen retains screenwriting credit. Fosse and Feuer traveled to West Germanywhere producers chose to shoot the film, in order to finish assembling the film crew.

During this time, Fosse highly recommended Robert L. Surtees for cinematographer, but Feuer and the top executives saw Surtees's work on Sweet Charity as one of the film's many artistic problems.

Producers eventually chose British cinematographer Geoffrey Unsworth. Charlotte Flemming designed costumes. Fosse was given the option of using Grey as Master of Ceremonies or walking away from the production.

Fosse hired Michael York as Sally Bowles's bisexual love interest. Several smaller roles, as well as the remaining four dancers in the film, were eventually cast in Germany. Filming Rehearsals and filming took place entirely in West Germany.

Editing was done in Los Angeles before the eventual theatrical release in February Narrative and news reading Although the songs throughout the film allude to and advance the narrative, every song except "Tomorrow Belongs to Me" is executed in the context of a Kit Kat Klub performance.

The voice heard on the radio reading the news throughout the film in German was that of associate producer Harold Nebenzal, whose father Seymour Nebenzahl made such notable Weimar films as MTestament of Dr.

Mabuseand Threepenny Opera Differences between film and stage version The film is significantly different from the Broadway musical. In the film version, she is American. The character of Cliff Bradshaw was renamed Brian Roberts and made British as was Isherwood, upon whom the character was based rather than American as in the stage version.

The characters and plot lines involving Fritz, Natalia and Max were pulled from I Am a Camera and did not appear in the stage version of Cabaret or in "Goodbye to Berlin"and a minor character named Max in the stage version, the owner of the Kit Kat Klub, bears no relation to the character in the film.Unlike "Titanic"(), which also intermingled historical events with a love story, "Cabaret" uses the cabaret as a device to comment on the goings-on in the story surrounding it, yet doesn't feel tacked on or phony like the former film.

Jan 01,  · "Cabaret" explores some of the same kinky territory celebrated in Visconti's "The Damned." Both movies share the general idea that the rise of the Nazi party in Germany was accompanied by a rise in bisexuality, homosexuality, sadomasochism, and assorted other activities.

Taken as a generalization about a national movement, this is certainly extreme oversimplification/5. "Cabaret" has an excellent HD picture, with very accurate colors (as with the flesh tones, for example), vivid colors, and it's sharp enough, considering that it's a film and has a soft layer of grain (as it was photographed originally).

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Cabaret: Original Soundtrack Recording ( Film) Original Soundtrack Recording ( Film) John Kander. Helpful. 0 Comment Report abuse I was in high school in and Cabaret made a profound impression on me.

I adored the movie and owned the soundtrack and played it over and over. Take Cabaret (), which began life as a hit Broadway musical except that wasn't the beginning either.

Prior to that, it existed as John Van Druten's play (and wretched film) I Am a Camera. Liza Minelli plays an annoying cabaret singer who turns a gay guy straight, gets pregnant (possibly by him, possibly by one of the other guys she was sleeping with) and then has an abortion%.

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